Sanjhi Workshop

Sanjhi Art Workshop was held at CSMVS (museum), Mumbai on 7th August 2017 by the State Award Winner Artist Vijay Soni.

Sanjhi is a traditional art from Mathura, Uttar Pradesh.

Here’s a glimpse of the Workshop.

Stills of our participants learning the Traditional Art form of Mathura – Sanjhi Art

Sanjhi Workshop, Sanjhi, Art, Mumbai, Workshop, craft, paramparik karigarSanjhi Workshop, Sanjhi, Art, Mumbai, Workshop, craft, paramparik karigar Sanjhi Workshop, Sanjhi, Art, Mumbai, Workshop, craft, paramparik karigarSanjhi Workshop, Sanjhi, Art, Mumbai, Workshop, craft, paramparik karigarSanjhi Workshop, Sanjhi, Art, Mumbai, Workshop, craft, paramparik karigar

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Miniature Painting Workshop

Stills of the exquisite art of Miniature painting workshop with renowned Artist Kailas Chand Kumawat held on 4-5 Aug.’17 at the CSMVS (museum) Mumbai.

A workshop much appreciated by the participants.

Day 1 (4th August 2017)

Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop

 

Day 2 (5th August 2017)

Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop Miniature Painting, painting, workshop, paramparik karigar, mumbai events, mumbai workshop

 

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Mithila Art Workshop

Discover a glimpse of Mithila Art workshop from Bihar with our National Award Winning Artist – Moti Karn, held on the 2 & 3 Aug at the CSMVS (museum)

Mithila workshop by Moti Karn, Mithia workshop, madhubani painting, national award winning artist, painting, art, paramparik karigar Mithila workshop by Moti Karn, Mithia workshop, madhubani painting, national award winning artist, painting, art, paramparik karigar Mithila workshop by Moti Karn, Mithia workshop, madhubani painting, national award winning artist, painting, art, paramparik karigar Mithila workshop by Moti Karn, Mithia workshop, madhubani painting, national award winning artist, painting, art, paramparik karigar

The black & white painting are done by the participants who attended this workshop

WhatsApp Image 2017-08-04 at 12.42.47 PM WhatsApp Image 2017-08-04 at 12.42.46 PM WhatsApp Image 2017-08-04 at 12.42.45 PMWhatsApp Image 2017-08-04 at 12.42.49 PM

Learn a glimpse about Mithila Art in the videos below.

 

 

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Know your Handicrafts- Weaves from Kanchipuram

kanchipuram

 

 

Textiles from KANCHIPURAM, Tamil Nadu.

Kanchipuram specializes in heavy silk saris woven with tightly twisted three-ply, high-denier threads, using thick jari threads for supplementary warp and weft patterning. Interlocked weft borders are common. Along with silk saris, Kanchipuram also is well-reputed for its cotton saris. Traditional motifs such as, mango, elephant, peacock, diamond, lotus, pot, creeper, flower, parrot, hen, and depiction of stories from mythology are very common in Kanchipuram saris.

Cotton saris are ornamented with threads and some silk saris are also woven with thread instead of pure jari. The south Indian saris are a class by themselves both in silk and also in delicate cottons. The silk ones are heavy with broad borders and elaborate pallavs usually in contrasting colours. The colours are typical dark Indian shades. Kanchipuram in Tamil Nadu is amongst the best known for its exquisite silk and cotton saris.

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Know Your Handicrafts- Pattachitra

Pattachitra

Orissa

Handicraft/Art

pattachitra

 

Pattachithra is a Sanskrit word, from the words, ?patta? meaning cloth and ?Chithra? meaning pictures. The artists were traditionally called Chithrakars.

Stylistically, the Pattachithra resembles the old murals of that region, which date back to 5th century BC. The folk paintings of Orissa have flourished around the great religious centers of Puri, Konarak and Bhubaneswar. The best work is found in and around Puri, especially in the village of Raghurajpur. Pattachitra is a traditional craft, where the artisans delicately paint on primed cloth or ‘patta’ in the finest detail. The ‘chitrakars’ (artists) prepare, what looks like a hard card paper using layers of old Dhoti cloth and sticking them together with a mixture of chalk and tamarind seed gum, which gives the surface a smooth leathery finish, especially after it is rubbed with a conch shell. The theme is sketched with a pencil, then outlined with a fine brush using vivid earth and stone colours obtained from natural sources, like the white pigment prepared from conch shells, yellow from orpiment, red from cinnabar and black from lamp soot. After completion, the painting is held over red hot charcoals and lac mixed with resin powder is sprinkled over the surface. When this melts, it is rubbed over the entire surface to give a coating of lac. A recent modification in Pattachitra paintings is the division of the Patta into a row full of squares with the high-point of the story in the larger centre square and various events portrayed in the other squares. Themes usually depict the Jagannath temple with its three deities – Lord Jagannath, his brother Balabhadra and sister Subhadra and the famous Rath Yatra festival. These paintings were originally substitutes for worship on days when the temple doors were shut for the ‘ritual bath’ of the deity. Many Pattachitra paintings are from the ancient Indian texts based on Vishnu and Krishna. The paintings are of various shapes and sizes.

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Our August exhibition- A Journey

Hello all! Paramparik Karigar is getting ready for its next exciting event. Yes, all our regulars- that’s right, our August Exhibition at World Trade Centre.

 

August. Mumbai. The city struck by unrelenting slivery spindles of rain. The last cup of chai you had was one cup too many. You fear that if you don’t step out of your home now, you will succumb and eat that bhajjia you have been resisting for the last many weeks . You worry  about other seemingly random things, watching the rain- Ganapathy and Navratra are not too far off.

 

Trust us- what you need is to step over to our exhibition. A vibrant collection of traditional handicrafts, arts and textiles- saris and yardage from corners of the country, dying and famous arts and familiar and rare handicrafts that you can acquaint yourself with, learn about, talking to the craftspeople directly and take the one that caught your fancy home; buy all the troublesome gifts plaguing your mind, knowing you are buying a piece of your heritage or a slice of our collective history. Or just drop by to browse in the colourful, brilliant hall and breathe in the buzzing creativity. What else can be in the air in room full of artists? Different genres rubbing shoulders- an art lovers dream

 

Yes the dates- Dates going up very soon on our face book page. Here

 

We are getting ready to host this show for you. And how.

Today, the office was thick with name- calling. What? Yes, we did call out names of participating craftsmen, artisans and weavers. Heated debates and long pleading monologues. Well, we make no bones about it- we love all our crafts. Sometimes when we get on our soapboxes, we need a crane to prise us off. Today was one of those days. The beginnings often are. Names conjured up images and anecdotes that were shared over hot sweetened tea, that were more like shots than cups. And homemade muttiyas. Well, we refuse to work on empty stomachs- food for the body and food for the soul.

 

We wrestled, negotiated and argued and a list emerged. Many old favourites and some new rabbits out of the hat too. Patience. The curtain will be opened slowly over the next few posts and all will be revealed.

 

Slowly the group disbanded… er.. the meeting ended. We part to meet again.

With another instalment on this journey to our exhibition, august 2017

Watch this space- the story unfolds here

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Glad to announce Award received by Khushboo Pandit at Prafulla Dahanukar Art Foundation

Glad to announce Award received by Khushboo Pandit at Prafulla Dahanukar Art Foundation

We are Paramparik Karigar are extremely glad to announce that Khushboo Pandit has been awarded all India Platinum Artist Award

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award paramparik karigar

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award paramparik karigar

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award paramparik karigar

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award paramparik karigar

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award paramparik karigar

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award paramparik karigar

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award paramparik karigar

Khushboo Pandit awarded all india platinum artist award paramparik karigar

 

We are extremely happy and glad to note the same.

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Invitation card and workshop poster for April 2017 exhibition

Invitation card and workshop poster for April 2017 exhibition

Dear Readers,

Here is our exhibition and workshop poster for April 2017

Mumbai art exhibition Paramparik Karigar

2) Upcoming Workshop:

DOWNLOAD Workshop details – April 2017

 

Join us on our FACEBOOK PAGE – Click here

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Know Your Handicrafts- Gond Painting II

Cont from part I 

Paramparik Dec2011

A Historical Perspective :

This eponymous painting style is a folk/ tribal art form practiced by The Gond Tribes, largely from Madhya Pradesh. The word, ‘Gond’ comes from the Dravidian expression, Kond which means ‘the green mountain’.

Painting in the region can probably be dated back to 1400 AD, the time when the history of the Gond people starts to appear. However, it is also possible, some experts say that it could be even more ancient than that- it could be a continuation of the cave paintings of their ancestors, a possibility suggested by the cave paintings in the region that go all the way back to the Stone Ages, Bhimbetka being an example.

The Gond people have a belief that viewing a good (auspicious) image begets good luck. This belief led the Gond people to decorate the walls as well as the floor of their houses with traditional tattoos and motifs. Digna and Bhittichitra (frescos) paintings are painted by the tribal people on floors and the walls of their houses Gond paintings have also been used by the Gond people as a way to record their history.

The Gonds traditionally painted on mud walls of their houses Gond wall decorations are made with a thick stick dipped in mud or clay mixed with chaff and water. When a house is under construction, the mud wall is kept damp for patterns to be imposed on it, which is then covered with cow dung or lime.

Mostly orally transmitted, Gond iconography has now, found representation in their colourful and vibrant art.

Gond Art Today

Starting in the early 1980s, certain talented Pardhan Gonds, who traditionally serve as professional bardic-priests, began transforming their ritual performing arts into a new tradition of figurative and narrative visual art: using a variety of modern media (including acrylic paintings on canvas, ink drawings on paper, silkscreen prints, and animated film) they have created unprecedented depictions of their natural and mythological worlds, traditional songs and oral histories

A rich visual narrative imagery thus evolved from juxtaposed forms from the folklore.

 

Some tales from their Charming folklore:

 

The story of Shiva and Mahua

Once while walking through a forest, Lord Shiva, the God of Destruction, was tempted by the shade of Mahua tree and longed to rest a while. As he settled himself under the tree, tired and thirsty as he was, he happened to see some water that had collected in one of the hollows of the tree. Now, the Mahua fruit is well known as an intoxicant. The hollow in the tree also contained some over-ripe mahua fruit and when Shiva drank it, he quickly became mildly and pleasantly inebriated. The ‘water’ tasted delicious – cool and sweet and scented by the mahua fruit, and soon Shiva was drinking from it again and again!

 

As his intoxication grew, Shiva went from babbling like a parrot (lost control over his tongue!), to becoming aggressive and intimidating, like a tiger, and then finally lost all control and rolled in the dirt like a boar, grunting and growling without a thought to his standing or position….It is an interesting tale, and not just at one level…it cautions one of the dangerous effects of over-imbibing alcohol, persuading you to consider that if Shiva himself was reduced to an animal, what chance have you, a mere mortal, to have dominion over yourself when under the influence of intoxicants.

This story is usually depicted with the God, the tree and the animals.

The Peacock and its Ugly Feet

Another Gondi folktale tells the story of how God resolved to create the universe in just fourteen days. Over the first seven days, he created the earth and the skies and then filled the space between them with all the plants and animals. God wanted, in that the universe, a piece of unsurpassable beauty and he had seven days to make it. After much thought, he came up with the creature we call the peacock.

Making this new creature was painstaking and time-consuming work – the body, the sharp eyes, the resplendent plumage took six and a half days. Now God had just half a day to make the creature’s feet. Pressed for time, God did a hasty job with the feet. The creature was completed just as the fourteenth day ended and the result was a little incongruous- a spectacularly beautiful creature with ungainly feet. However, the ugly feet serve a deeper purpose- of keeping the vanity of even the most beautiful creation of God in check.

Udata Hathi or the Flying Elephant

This Gond folktale tells the story of the winged elephant (Udata Hathi) that was used by Gods and Goddesses in heaven, to transport them from place to place. One day, when the Lord was resting he told the elephant to take a break. The elephant flew down to the earth. There he found fields of sugarcane and banana trees. He gave into temptation and started eating the sugarcane. The villagers became angry and alarmed. They tried to scare him away. But the elephant would not move. The villagers then called out to the Lord for help. The Lord appeared and was displeased with the Elephant. He ordered the Elephant to never to go to earth again. But the Elephant had now tasted the forbidden fruit and couldn’t stay away. He went back to Earth to eat the sugarcane. The villagers once again turned the Lord for help .This time  Lord was furious. He told the villagers to organize a feast and to invite the Elephant to it. The Elephant came to the feast . The delicious feast and the accompanying Mahua wine made the elephant fell asleep. Whilst he was asleep, the Lord cut off his wings .He gave one to the Banana tree and one to the Peacock. From that day the Peacock has a beautiful Plumage and the Banana tree has large leaves.

Some Interesting Facts for the Trivia Buff :

According to the Gond belief system, each and everything whether it is a hill, river, rock or a tree is inhabited by a spirit and, consequently, is sacred. So the Gond people paint them as a form of respect and reverence.  It can also showcase abstract concepts like emotions, dreams and imagination.

Gond paintings bear a remarkable likeness aboriginal art from Australia as both styles use dots to create the painting.

Gond Art on the left, Aboriginal art on the right

Paramparik Dec2011                         aborgine art

Sources :

Paramparik Karigar Archives

http://www.deccanfootprints.com/collections/gond-art#

http://www.utsavpedia.com/motifs-embroideries/gond-painting/

http://indiantribalzone.blogspot.in/p/gond-art.html

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Know Your Handicrafts – Gond Painting – I

 

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GOND PAINTING

 

Place of origin: Madhya Pradesh and its surrounding states.

Earliest Recorded History – though no textual record exists, the origin of the art form can be traced back to Pre- Aryan era

Genre: Art, Tribal. Traditionally on walls and floors of homes. Now on a variety of modern media, including acrylic paintings on canvas, ink drawings on paper, silkscreen prints, and even animated film.

Geographical Spread :

The Gond territory extended from the Godavari in the south to the Vindhyas in the north. This art form is popular among most tribes in Madhya Pradesh and it is particularly well developed as an art among the Gond tribe of Mandala District.

Technique:

The artist makes a rough paper outline on his/her chosen medium. Geometric patterns, animals, human figures and flowers patterns, local deities, cock fights, forest scenes, agriculture, weddings and scenes fro local folklore are common images in Gond Art. They are often formed of interesting circles and spirals. These are sometimes enhanced with alternate triangles. The artist makes sure to draw the inner as well as outer lines with as much care as possible so that the perfection of the lines has an immediate effect on the viewer. Lines are used in such a way that it conveys a sense of movement to the still images. Dots and dashes are added to impart a greater sense of movement and increase the amount of detail.

Bright colours, such as white, red, blue and yellow are first filled in. The paints are usually derived naturally from objects such as charcoal, coloured soil, plant sap, leaves and even cow dung. More specifically, yellow from Chui mitti which is a type of local sand, brown from Gheru mitti which is another type of sand, green is readily procured from leaves while the colour red is obtained from the Hibiscus flower.

Once the bright colours have been filled into the larger forms drawn on the canvas or paper, small ‘signature pattern’ motifs evocative of tattoos or elements of nature are drawn or ‘infilled’.

Rich in detail, colour, mystery and humour, these tribal artworks brilliantly employ modern means to evoke the pre-modern psyche.

Some Unique Characteristics of Gond Art:

1. The subject of these paintings are extends from myths and folklores to images of daily              life – not only from what exists but also much that is drawn from dreams, memory and imagination. Local deities, cockfights, forest scenes, agriculture, weddings and other visuals find a significant place in Gond tribal art.

  1. The traditional motifs usually carry a special significance. For example, a fish stands for fertility and the Tortoise for stability.
  2. These paintings have a basic simplicity. They appear without anatomical details, and move in silhouettes. A simple impression of a pair of wings turns gradually into a geometric figure. A fish is symbolized by bones and a tortoise by its flippers.
  3. Colours too have a symbolic significance. Designs in white or red wash on the floor ensure security of the house.
  4. These artists work with inherited conventions and so each artist brings something unique and individual to this expression of shared heritage.
  5. One of the distinctive elements is the use of ‘signature patterns’ that is used to ‘infill’ the larger forms on the canvas. These infill patterns are distinctive identifying marks used by the Gond artists and every Pardhan Gond painter has developed his or her own signature style.
  6. Numerous Gods and Goddesses, strange and exotic birds, flying snakes,tigers, dogs and cattle, breathtakingly beautiful trees and several other entities who inhabited the age old songs of the Pardhans – these are just some of the wonderful and fabulous subject matters of Gond art. What is amazing is that all of these originally existed as notes and lyrics and nuances of their story telling musical traditions, and have gradually evolved and manifested on the canvas in vibrant colors and in an inimitable, distinctive style.

 

More on Gond Art coming up on part II

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